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Links for Oregon LGBTQ Black History


Edited by George T. Nicola
Last updated January 6, 2018

The LGBTQ community owes a great deal to the work of our African American members and allies over the years. GLAPN has recognized these individuals in various ways, but this is our first effort to get everything on the same page.

Some of these items are links to articles that appeared in other publications. Some are hyperlinks to other pages on GLAPN.org


Articles in community media

GLAPN CELEBRATES BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH Q CENTER EXHIBIT
An article from PQ Monthly about the 2017 Black LGBTQ History exhibit at Q Center.
 
 
How Antoinette Edwards Takes Care of Portland’s At-Risk Youth
Portland Monthly magazine's article about Antoinette Edwards.
When Your Child Comes Out: Embracing an LGBT Loved One
From Ebony Magazine

Profiles on GLAPN.org


Hearts & Voices: Gladys McCoy, Personal Recollections of Oregon Gay History, by George T. Nicola
Gladys McCoy and her husband Bill, both of whom held either appointed or elected public office, were significant in early efforts towards LGBTQ rights.

Rediscovering Family: Audria M. Edwards, by George T. Nicola
Audria Edwards stepped up to support her LGBTQ children at a time when that didn't always happen. She was the first African American president of a PFLAG chapter in the USA, and today a scholarship fund is named in her memory.

Rediscovering Family: Keith, Antoinette and Khalil Edwards, by George T. Nicola
The Edwards family founded Portland's Black PFLAG chapter, have seen it grow through its current and expanded identity as Sankofa Cooperative, and spread their support far and wide through communities of color among LGBTQ young people.

Community Profile: Elton Cody, Openly Gay Rap Artist, by George T. Nicola
From his Facebookk page: "Elton's music predominantly speaks and caters, though not exclusively, to the everyday life and issues of the African American Community, LGBTQ community, and adolescents at risk.
Unwanted Child:The Story of the 14th Amendment in Oregon,by George T. Nicola.
Oregon's legislature ratified the 14th Amendment, and then withdrew the ratification – until Representative Bill McCoy pushed for re-ratification in 1973.
 

Audio and video

Oral History: Khalil Edwards
With his parents, Antoinette and Keith Edwards, Khalil was co-founder of PFLAG Portland's Black Chapter, and he has held a variety of leadership positions in the community. (includes both audio and transcriptions)

Oral History: Rupert Kinnard
Since he arrived in the community in 1979, Rupert has been involved in local publications and was one of the founders of Brother to Brother, one of the city's earliest groups for gay black men. (includes audio and transcription)

Antoinette Edwards speech at Queer Heroes NW 2017 Reception
Antoinette Edwards visited the Queer Heroes reception in June, 2017, to honor two individuals she had once mentored, and GLAPN's Bev Standish captured it on video.

Our Families: LGBT African American Stories
LGBT storiesA video from Basic Rights Oregon.

 

 

 

 

 


 

GLAPN's Queer Heroes

Since 2012, GLAPN has celebrated Pride by honoring a Queer Hero for every day in June. Each year the community nominates individuals who should be recognized for risk, sacrifice, service, example or inspiration in their service to the LGBTQ community. Their pictures and profiles are featured in a gallery show at Q Center, and all years' Queer Heroes are invited to a gallery reception at Q Center just before Pride weekend.

Here are the African American Queer Heroes who have been honored since 2012:

Gladys McCoy
BIll McCoyThe late Gladys and Bill McCoy were both active politically, and were the first African-Americans in the positions to which they were elected. Each of them also contributed to gay civil rights on the legislative front. Read more …
Cecil Prescod
From the beginnings of LGBTQ civil rights efforts, there have been members of the clergy working to include all colors of the rainbow in the community of faith. Rev. Cecil Prescod wasl nominated as Heroes for the work he did in the LGBTQ community. Read more …
Kathleen Saadat
Kathleen Saadat helped organize Portland's first gay rights march in 1976. She was a leader in defeating the Oregon Citizens Alliance measures of the 1990s, and she has touched all levels of government in Oregon. Read more …
Lady Elaine Peacock
The late Lady Elaine Peacock left an indelible mark on Portland with her beauty, talent, fundraising and networking skills, and her legacy continues today. Read more …
Harold Strong
Harold Strong has been active in the LGBTQ community since the 1970s. He was the first African-American Emperor in the International Court System, and he is generous with time and talent as a fundraiser, a historian, and a youth mentor. Read more …
Rupert Kinnard
As an African American, gay, paraplegic artist and activist, Rupert Kinnard has been a thoughtful and creative voice in Portland's LGBTQ comunity since he arrived here in 1979. Read more …
Poison Waters
Many Portlanders know of Poison Waters: she is an entertainer and ambassador who transcends all boundaries of gender, race, and situation. Not so many people are aware of the work that Kevin Cook has been doing in our community for decades. Read more …
Antoinette and Keith Edwards
Antoinette and Keith Edwards are co-founders of Portland PFLAG's Black Chapter, the first Black PFLFAG chapter in the USA. Read more …
Cliff Jones
Cliff Jones' first volunteer gig was at Pride in 1981, and he has been active in Portland's LGBTQ community ever since. Read more …
Leila Hofstein
Leila Hofstein is a powerhouse among queer and trans youth of color, connecting them to community resources and teaching them how to work together to create a powerful community. Read more …
Margaret-Ann Jones
As an African-American lesbian, Margaret-Ann Jones stands at the intersection of several kinds of discrimination. Having recently turned 65, she found herself turning the corner at another intersection. Read more …
Audria Edwards Composite
The Audria M. Edwards Scholarship Fund has been granting aid to LGBTQ students in Oregon and SW Washington since the early 1990s. The story of creating, naming, and continuing this organization involves some of the most prominent names in Portland's LGBTQ community. Read more …
Amani Jabari
The late Amani Jabari was one of the first activists to address the crisis of AIDS among people of color in Oregon. Read more …
Giovanni McKenzie Giovanni Blair McKenzie is founder of Queer Intersections (Qi), advocating for LGBTQ youth of color. Read more …
Kendall Clawson Kendall Clawson was Q Center's first executive director; and she went on to serve as Deputy Chief of Staff for two of Oregon's governors. Read more …
Llondyn Elliott Llondyn Elliott is a high-school student in Portland, already active for racial justice and LGBTQ causes in her community. Read more …
Maurice Evans Since his own diagnosis in 1983, Maurice Evans has worked locally and at the state level to improve services for HIV/AIDS patients. Read more …
Cory L. Murphy Cory L. Murphy is an emerging leader in Portlands African American and LGBTQ communities. Read more …
Picture of Darion Demartez Jones Darion Demartez Jones has been involved in LGBTQ activism for almost half of his life. He is currently on the board of PFLAG Portland's Black Chapter. He is creator and host of QTPOC Talk on KBOO-FM, supporting Portland’s Queer and Trans Community of Color; and in a full-time job in our region's philanthropic community he's bringing new focus on inclusion and equity. Read more …
Picture of Geeta Lewis Geeta Lewis found Q Center when she needed it, and volunteered to help there wherever she could. Now she's on Q Center's board of directors, advocated for programming that is more accessible to working poor people, people of color, and transgender women. Read more …
Picture of Judge Kemp Judge Kemp works quietly in the Governor's office, helping to make Oregon state boards and commissions more representative of the state's population, including LGBTQ folks, women, and people of color. He's more likely to be known as an eloquent writer or one of the forces behind Portland's iconic Red Dress Party. Read more …
Jaycen Marcus Jaycen Marcus, a transgender male, wanted to live in the men's dorm with his friends, and George Fox University denied the request. The resulting legal case made headlines nationwide. Read more …
Tyler TerMeer Tyler TerMeer was diagnosed with HIV at the age of 21, and decided to spend his life openly as an HIV positive gay man of color, helping others living with HIV, and advocating for effective HIV policy. He has a remarkable record of service at state- and national levels, and he was recognized in 2012 by the Obama White House as one of the Nation’s Emerging LGBTQ+ Leaders, and then again in 2013 as being among the Emerging Black LGBTQ+ leadership in the country. In 2014, Tyler TerMeer was hired as Executive Director of Cascade AIDS Project (CAP). Read more …
Tashia Harris Tashia Harris (they/them/theirs and he/him/his pronouns) came to Portland to work at Western States Center as the Racial Justice Program director. Tashia is fresh from leadership at George Mason University’s Women and Gender Studies Department, Fairfax, VA. Tashia is being praised for quick and clear analysis of intersectional issues, plus insightful and appropriate action. However, most of the praise comes from the teaching that lifts up everybody who spends time around them. Read more …
LaKeesha Dumas & O'Nesha Cochran-Dumas After years of addiction, homelessness and jail time, LaKeesha Dumas and O'Nesha Cochran-Dumas got clean in 2011 after they met and fell in love. After that, going back to jail and being separated from one another was too hard to bear. They joined PFLAG Portland's Black Chapter early in recovery, and eventually sat on that organization's Board of Directors. Both women are now in recovery, with jobs in the mental health sector, and providing outreach and training in the community. Read more …
Charles Jordan Charles Jordan was appointed in 1994 to fill a vacancy, becoming the first African-American on the Portland City Council. He immediately proved himself an ally to the LGBTQ community, voting in December 1974 for a ban on sexual orientation discrimination in city employment. As police commissioner, he put a stop to harrassment of LGBTQ young people at Portland's only all-ages nightclub that welcomed queer youth. His commitment to police accountability limited his career, but later he returned to city government as Director of Parks and Recreation. Read more …
BJ Jones Beryl "BJ" Jones is featured in the Basic Rights Oregon video “Our Families: LGBT African American Stories,” relating how in the 1980s, her lesbianism resulted in loss of custody of her daughter. Over the years she has been an active volunteer in PFLAG – both the Portland and the newer Washington County chapters. Read more …
Anthony Rivers Anthony Rivers created a "Black Health Matters" campaign in Portland as part of his HIV prevention outreach through Cascade AIDS Project, working with Sankofa Collective Northwest and A6 (African American AIDS Awareness Action Alliance). Read more …
   
   

 

 

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